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AILA Recognizes H-1B Cap Reached and Recommends Changes

Cite as "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 11231102 (posted Nov. 23, 2011)"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Wednesday, November 23, 2011

CONTACT:
George Tzamaras / Jenny Werwa
202-507-7649 / 202-507-7628
gtzamaras@aila.org / jwerwa@aila.org

WASHINGTON, DC – The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) commented on Wednesday’s announcement from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that it has received a sufficient number of H-1B petitions to reach the statutory cap of 65,000 visas for fiscal year 2012 since the filing window opened on April 1st this year.

“During a time when job creation is the nation’s number one priority, why are we still fiddling around with an outmoded quota system that ignores the importance of immigrants to the economic engine?” said AILA President Eleanor Pelta.

“The marketplace dictates the pace and type of demand by business for specialized workers. To be more competitive globally, we really should be smarter about our high skilled visa distribution so that it is related to market needs instead of pinned to a static limit that was determined by Congress in the last decade,” continued Pelta. “Congress needs to be working on ways to make the visa system work for fueling the economy. The status quo is no longer acceptable.”

H-1B petitions are filed by U.S. employers seeking to hire a specific foreign national in a specialty occupation involving the theoretical and practical application of a body of specialized knowledge (such as the sciences, medicine and health care, education, biotechnology). The numerical limitation on H-1B petitions for fiscal year 2012 is 65,000. Additionally, the first 20,000 H-1B petitions filed on behalf of aliens who have earned a U.S. master’s degree or higher are exempt from the fiscal year cap.

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The American Immigration Lawyers Association is the national association of immigration lawyers established to promote justice, advocate for fair and reasonable immigration law and policy, advance the quality of immigration and nationality law and practice, and enhance the professional development of its members.

 
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