Featured Issues

Featured Issue: Executive Actions to Promote Family Unity and Help Dreamers

Use this page to find information on the June 18, 2024, announcements regarding a new process for certain noncitizen spouses of U.S. citizens to apply for lawful permanent residence without having to leave the United States and to help certain college graduates more quickly receive work visas.
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Alert
Program Not Accepting Applications Yet
This program is expected to launch by the end of the summer after a Federal Register notice detailing the application process and other information is published. Applications submitted prior to the start date listed in the notice will be rejected.

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AILA has created a listserv open to any interested AILA members to raise questions or concerns and discuss these announcements. You can join by going into My AILA on AILA's website and adding a new listserv.
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Information Regarding Parole-in-Place

On June 18, DHS provided the following information:

DHS will establish a new process to consider, on a case-by-case basis, requests for certain noncitizen spouses of U.S. citizens:

  • who have lived in the United States for 10 years or more.
  • do not pose a threat to public safety or national security.
  • are otherwise eligible to apply for adjustment of status.
  • and merit a favorable exercise of discretion.

If eligible, these noncitizens will be able to apply for lawful permanent residence without leaving the United States.

DHS estimates that approximately 500,000 noncitizen spouses of U.S. citizens could be eligible to access this process; on average, these noncitizens have resided in the United States for 23 years. Approximately 50,000 children of these spouses also will be eligible for this process.

Note that noncitizens who pose a threat to national security or public safety will not be eligible for this process. If a noncitizen poses a threat to national security or public safety, DHS will detain, remove, or refer them to other federal agencies for further vetting, investigation, or prosecution as appropriate.
 

Eligibility and Process

To be considered on a case-by-case basis for this process, an individual must:   

  • Be present in the United States without admission or parole; 
  • Have been continuously present in the United States for at least 10 years as of June 17, 2024; and 
  • Have a legally valid marriage to a U.S. citizen as of June 17, 2024. 

In addition, individuals must have no disqualifying criminal history or otherwise constitute a threat to national security or public safety and should otherwise merit a favorable exercise of discretion.

Noncitizen children of potential requestors may also be considered for parole under this process if they are physically present in the United States without admission or parole and have a qualifying stepchild relationship with a U.S. citizen as of June 17, 2024.

Upon receipt of a properly filed parole-in-place request, USCIS will determine on a case-by-case basis whether a grant of parole is warranted and whether the applicant merits a favorable exercise of discretion. All requests will take into consideration the potential requestor’s previous immigration history, criminal history, the results of background checks and national security and public safety vetting, and any other relevant information available to or requested by USCIS. USCIS has strong processes in place to identify and address potential fraud, which will be applied here to ensure the integrity of this program.

A Federal Register notice will be published that outlines the specific steps to be considered under this program. To be considered, an individual must file a form with USCIS along with supporting documentation to show they meet the requirements and pay a fee.

Further information regarding eligibility and the application process, including a notice in the Federal Register, will be published soon. USCIS will reject any filings or individual requests received before the application period begins later this summer.
 

Key Resources on This Program

 

Biden’s New ‘Parole-in-Place’ Program: Helping Mixed-Status Families Stay Together

English Version


 

Spanish Version

Information Regarding Changes for DACA Recipients and Other Dreamers

On June 18, the White House announced that individuals, including DACA recipients and other Dreamers, who have earned a degree at an accredited U.S. institution of higher education in the United States, and who have received an offer of employment from a U.S. employer in a field related to their degree, will be able to more quickly receive work visas.

Eligibility and Process for D-3 Waivers for the Three- and Ten-Year Bars of Dreamers

DOS provided the following FAQs:

Q: What will these process clarifications mean for current NIV ineligibility waiver processing steps?

  • These clarifications will describe when consular officers should consider recommending that the Department of Homeland Security waive ineligibility for these applicants on an expedited basis, in conjunction with visa applications overseas. However, the processing steps will remain the same.
  • Waiver requests are adjudicated by the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Admissibility Review Office.
  • For additional information related to visa ineligibility waivers, please visit our website: Ineligibilities and Waivers: Laws (state.gov).

Q: If an applicant needs a visa ineligibility waiver, how can they request one as part of a standard interview?

  • Applicants who are denied a visa will generally be notified by the consular officer of the basis for the ineligibility, and whether they are eligible for a waiver of their ineligibility.
  • If an applicant is ineligible for a visa based on certain grounds of inadmissibility in Section 212(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, they may be eligible for a waiver.
  • Waiver requests are adjudicated by the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s Admissibility Review Office, based on a recommendation from the Department of State.
  • For additional information related to visa ineligibility waivers, please visit our website: Ineligibilities and Waivers: Laws (state.gov)
  • For questions related to waiver approvals, we refer you to the Department of Homeland Security.

Q: How will forthcoming edits to the Foreign Affairs Manual (FAM) clarify existing guidance to consular officers?

  • Upcoming FAM updates will clarify when consular officers should recommend that DHS grant a waiver of the applicant’s ineligibility, consistent with the waiver process that is already available under existing law to individuals seeking nonimmigrant visas, and consistent with Department regulations that describe the types of cases in which consular officers should consider recommending a waiver of ineligibility. It is not conferring any new benefits and is not limited to DACA recipients.
  • These updates will also encourage consular officers to consider recommending expedited review of waiver requests in conjunction with certain nonimmigrant visa applications overseas, consistent with existing Department regulations and guidance.
  • This will result in certain individuals to potentially more quickly receive work visas if DHS approves a waiver of ineligibility.
  • While leaving the United States to apply for a visa is not without risks, this policy will clarify when consular officers should consider recommending waivers, so that individuals and employers can make informed decisions and streamline the process so that those who qualify can get to work quickly.

Q: When will the guidance be issued?

  • Updated guidance for consular officers will be issued within the next 30 days.

Key Resources on This Program

Stop Notario Fraud
The wrong kind of immigration help can hurt. Learn who can help. Know where to find the right immigration help and where to turn if you’ve been harmed by someone unauthorized to provide immigration legal services.

 

Client Flyer: What Is the Affirmative Relief Announcement?

AILA provides a client flyer on President Biden's June 18, 2024, announcements to help certain undocumented individuals in the United States. There are English and Spanish versions of a generic PDF and a customizable Word version. Please share widely with your networks to help get the word out that it is important for individuals seeking immigration advice to speak with a qualified immigration attorney and to be aware of notarios.

Share the Client Flyers

 

General Information about Parole-in-Place and DACA/Dreamers Changes


Agency Guidance and Announcements


AILA Statements


Practice Resources


AILA Products


Media Coverage

Browse the Featured Issue: Executive Actions to Promote Family Unity and Help Dreamers collection
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Practice Resources

Briefing: New Executive Actions to Streamline D-3 Waivers and Employment Visas for College Grads, Including Dreamers

Watch the recording from a briefing from the Presidents’ Alliance, TheDream.US, and partners that discussed the significance of the executive actions to streamline D-3 waivers and access to employment-based visas for eligible college and university graduates.

7/10/24 AILA Doc. No. 24071206. Consular Processing, Students & Schools, Waivers
Practice Resources

General Waiver for Nonimmigrants: Processes and Procedures

AILA provides an excerpt from the 4th edition of The Waivers Book, discussing INA §212(d)(3) waivers.

Practice Resources

Practice Pointer: The Biden Administration’s Parole-in-Place Program for Certain Spouses and Stepchildren of U.S. Citizens

The Biden Administration recently announced an expansion of the existing parole-in-place program. AILA’s Military Committee provides a resource to assist members in understanding key differences between the program and what we know thus far about the new process.

Agency Memos & Announcements

DOS Issues Guidance on Easing the Nonimmigrant Visa Process for U.S. College Graduates

After the White House announced actions to allow certain individuals to more quickly receive nonimmigrant work visas, DOS clarified existing guidance to consular officers related to when they should consider recommending that DHS grant a waiver of ineligibility, where applicable.

6/18/24 AILA Doc. No. 24062001. Consular Processing, Waivers
Professional Resources

Navigating the Surge in Client Calls on New Parole-in-Place Rules

The recent announcement of new Parole-in-Place rules may lead to a significant increase in client inquiries and potential new client calls, leaving many legal professionals feeling overwhelmed. It's crucial to manage this surge effectively. Learn more with this quick Practice Success Tip.

AILA Public Statements, Press Releases

AILA Applauds Announcement of Life-Changing Protections for Undocumented Spouses of U.S. Citizens and Dreamers

AILA applauded the Biden Administration’s announcement of executive actions to provide protections and work authorization for some undocumented spouses and children of U.S. citizens and Dreamers with comments from President Kelli Stump and Executive Director Ben Johnson.